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dc.contributor.authorFinnvold, Jon Erik
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-07T21:06:01Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-29T14:02:08Z
dc.date.available2020-06-07T21:06:01Z
dc.date.available2021-04-29T14:02:08Z
dc.date.issued2013
dc.identifier.isbn978-82-7894-482-0
dc.identifier.issn0808-5013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12199/3412
dc.description.abstractThe report documents findings from two separate empirical investigations. Chances of success Part I is based on a register study, using 1985 as a baseline year. What are the chances to succeed in the educational system and labour market for children with physical disabilities, and how are their chances influenced by their family background and neighbourhood context? To answer this question, a sub-population of 1750 individuals with diagnoses related to physical disabilities (mainly cerebral palsy) was identified in official registers. The individuals were matched with registers in Statistics Norway, adding information about employment status, income and other socio-demographic variables. A random sample (reference group) with a similar age structure were constructed and matched with the same socio-demographic registers. Outcome variables included educational attainments and labour market participation in 2010, as well as income in 2009. Individuals in the disabled sample were three times less likely to complete a university education of any duration. Although disability status is the major limiting factor, both mothers and fathers educational background influenced the chances of accomplish a tertiary education. Evidence suggests that, for disabled in particular, living in areas with a higher overall educational level benefitted their educational attainments. A total of 36% of individuals with physical disabilities were employed, compared to 87% in the reference group. For both groups, income (in 2009) and employment prospects (2010) were to some extent negatively affected by childhood risk factors such as low parental education, father’s unemployment and growing up in single parent households. Educational achievements had a strong effect on income and labour market inclusion, in particular for the disabled group. A lack of success in the educational system resulted in a permanent weak inclusion in the labour market. Individuals aged 30 to 45 years in the disability group remained at the same income levels, whereas individuals in the random sample experienced increasing income levels in the same period. School segregation Part II of the study is based on a survey including parents that had children with physical disabilities in primary school (Net sample = 480, mainly cerebral palsy and spina bifida), in addition to information merged from a range of official registers. Less than half of the parents (43%) reported that their children participate in ordinary classroom education all of the time. About 14% attended special schools, whereas the remaining 43 % attended ordinary schools, but were more or less segregated from ordinary classroom education. Parents of children in special schools reported an overall high satisfaction with their child’s situation at school. However, children in special schools were characterized by limited social networks and infrequent social participation in after-school activities. The degree of segregation in ordinary school affected several aspects of parental experiences of their children’s situation at school. The more the child is segregated from ordinary classroom education, the lower are parental expectations for their children’s future educational attainments. Other factors also significantly influenced parents’ educational expectations such as how parents’ view their child’s performance in school, as well as various measures of the severity of the physical disability of the child. However, these factors could not account for the empirically strong association between segregation practices and parental expectations. Parental expectations were also significantly related to parent’s income and own educational attainments. The findings indicate that the expectations of parents with higher income and education to a lesser extent are affected by school segregation practices. Children that were segregated at school tended to have fewer friends, and were less integrated in both formal and informal arenas of social participation compared to children that were fully integrated in classroom education. Children with low income parents rarely participated in formally organized after-school activities. Parents living in municipalities with a high overall level of education tended to report more positive outcomes, irrespective of their own educational background.en
dc.description.abstractRapporten dokumenterer arbeidsmarknadstilknyting og utdanning for ei gruppe personar med fysisk funksjonsnedsetjing. Samanlikna med eit tilfeldig befolkningsutval i same alder var denne gruppa langt svakare stilt på arbeidsmarknaden; 36 prosent var yrkesaktive mot 87 prosent i den øvrige befolkninga. Lågt utdanningsnivå var hovudårsak til låg yrkesdeltaking . Rapporten analyserer også konsekvensane av tilhøve i barndommen, slik som foreldras sosiale bakgrunn, for sjansane til å lukkast i utdanning og arbeidsliv. Rapporten gir ö³g ei oversikt over skulesituasjonen til barn med fysiske funksjonsnedsetjingar, basert på ei spørjeundersøking blant foreldre. Sentrale tema er trivsel og samarbeid, men også deltaking i sosiale aktivitetar etter skuletid. Omfanget av segregerte undervisningsopplegg er omfattande og har negative konsekvensar på mange område. Pris: kr 120,-no_NB
dc.publisherOslo Metropolitan University - OsloMet: NOVA
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNOVA Rapport 12/13
dc.subjectNOVA
dc.titleLangt igjen?no_NB
dc.typeRapport
fagarkivet.author.linkhttps://www.oslomet.no/om/ansatt/jefinn
fagarkivet.source.pagenumber92


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