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RFID in Society – Preparing for the Internet of Things. Handbook of Methods Part 3 of 4

dc.contributor.authorSlettemeås, Dag
dc.contributor.authorStorm-Mathisen, Ardis
dc.contributor.authorHelle-Valle, Jo
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-21T15:28:23Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-29T12:43:43Z
dc.date.available2020-06-21T15:28:23Z
dc.date.available2021-04-29T12:43:43Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.isbn82-7063-466-2
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12199/5341
dc.description.abstractThis report is the third of four reports stemming from the RCN-financed project RFID in Society – Preparing for the Internet of Things (2010-2017). In addition to articles, conference papers, an exhibition, presentations, media contributions and a project website, the project has published the following reports:  Del. 1 of 4: “Case Criteria & Selection” Del. 2 of 4: “Case Analyses & Evaluation” Del. 3 of 4: “Handbook of Methods” Del. 4 of 4: “Final Report & Summary” The report provide an overview of the main epistemologies and methodologies that researchers face in practical research and innovation projects. Eight academic writings are described, based on theoretical-methodological inquiries of a range of RFIDrelated (or similar) applications stemming from the RFID in Society project. As present and future technology projects (in particular those that engage with IoT or pervasive systems) are often comprehensive – involving a range of different research disciplines, and combining technological development with social science research – it is crucial that all parties involved understand how knowledge is generated in/through these projects. In addition, innovators (designers, technologists) and researchers (academics) need to understand the premises on which the research is conducted, while policy needs to understand how to interpret the societal consequences identified and described in research outcomes. This latter aspect is particularly relevant to many recent projects that aspire to grasp and find solutions to large societal challenges. The main approaches specified here (positivism/interpretivism) are often considered incompatible (when it comes to being integrated in the same research design). We claim that this not necessarily the case. Combinations are possible, even though “full integration” needs substantial work. Both positivist and interpretivist epistemologies can inform each other, as can deductive and inductive methodologies/reasoning, and quantitative and qualitative methods. Even with substantial ground to cover in terms of achieving integration – it is still an asset for projects to be clear on what epistemological ground is being covered, and how the various research design elements involved are positioned against each other. This is the case of the RFID in Society project. We have made no attempt at integration, but the different perspectives have informed each other, they are applied where relevant to the study object, and they are exposed and critically discussed – being relevant parts of the total research design.en
dc.description.abstractThis report is the third of four reports stemming from the RCN-financed project RFID in Society – Preparing for the Internet of Things (2010-2017). In addition to articles, conference papers, an exhibition, presentations, media contributions and a project website, the project has published the following reports:  Del. 1 of 4: “Case Criteria & Selection” Del. 2 of 4: “Case Analyses & Evaluation” Del. 3 of 4: “Handbook of Methods” Del. 4 of 4: “Final Report & Summary” The report provide an overview of the main epistemologies and methodologies that researchers face in practical research and innovation projects. Eight academic writings are described, based on theoretical-methodological inquiries of a range of RFIDrelated (or similar) applications stemming from the RFID in Society project. As present and future technology projects (in particular those that engage with IoT or pervasive systems) are often comprehensive – involving a range of different research disciplines, and combining technological development with social science research – it is crucial that all parties involved understand how knowledge is generated in/through these projects. In addition, innovators (designers, technologists) and researchers (academics) need to understand the premises on which the research is conducted, while policy needs to understand how to interpret the societal consequences identified and described in research outcomes. This latter aspect is particularly relevant to many recent projects that aspire to grasp and find solutions to large societal challenges. The main approaches specified here (positivism/interpretivism) are often considered incompatible (when it comes to being integrated in the same research design). We claim that this not necessarily the case. Combinations are possible, even though “full integration” needs substantial work. Both positivist and interpretivist epistemologies can inform each other, as can deductive and inductive methodologies/reasoning, and quantitative and qualitative methods. Even with substantial ground to cover in terms of achieving integration – it is still an asset for projects to be clear on what epistemological ground is being covered, and how the various research design elements involved are positioned against each other. This is the case of the RFID in Society project. We have made no attempt at integration, but the different perspectives have informed each other, they are applied where relevant to the study object, and they are exposed and critically discussed – being relevant parts of the total research design.no_NB
dc.publisherOslo: Forbruksforskningsinstituttet SIFO
dc.relation.ispartofseriesProfessional report nr. 4-2017
dc.subjectSIFO, PublikasjonSIFO, RapporterSIFO
dc.titleRFID in Society – Preparing for the Internet of Things. Handbook of Methods Part 3 of 4en
dc.titleRFID in Society – Preparing for the Internet of Things. Handbook of Methods Part 3 of 4no_NB
dc.typeRapport
fagarkivet.author.linkhttps://www.oslomet.no/om/ansatt/valle/
fagarkivet.source.pagenumber85.0


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