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dc.contributor.authorNilsen, Wendy
dc.contributor.authorSkipstein, Anni
dc.contributor.authorØstby, Kristian Amundsen
dc.contributor.authorMykletun, Arnstein
dc.date.accessioned2017-05-11T13:05:16Z
dc.date.accessioned2017-07-04T10:32:19Z
dc.date.available2017-05-11T13:05:16Z
dc.date.available2017-07-04T10:32:19Z
dc.date.issued2017
dc.identifier.citationNilsen W, Skipstein A, Østby KA, Mykletun A. Examination of the double burden hypothesis—a systematic review of work–family conflict and sickness absence. European Journal of Public Health. 2017language
dc.identifier.issn1101-1262
dc.identifier.issn1464-360X
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10642/5050
dc.description.abstractBackground: Women consistently have higher sickness absence than men. The double-burden hypothesis suggests this is due to higher work–family burden in women than men. The current study aimed to systematically review prospective studies of work–family conflict and subsequent sickness absence. Methods: A systematic search was conducted in the electronic databases Medline, PsycINFO, and Embase with subject heading terms and keywords with no language or time restrictions. Two reviewers independently screened abstracts and read full-texts with pre-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria. Results: Eight included studies (n = 40 856 respondents) measure perceived work–family conflict and subsequent sickness absence. We found moderate evidence for a positive relationship between work–family conflict and subsequent sickness absence, and that women experience higher levels of work–family conflict than men. Conclusion: Work–family conflict is associated with later sickness absence, and work–family conflict is more common for women than for men. This indicates that work–family conflict may contribute to the gender gap in sick leave. However, further studies are needed to confirm whether this relationship is causal.language
dc.language.isoenlanguage
dc.publisherOxford University Presslanguage
dc.relation.urihttps://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckx054
dc.rights(c) The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.comlanguage
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/
dc.subjectGenderlanguage
dc.subjectIllnesslanguage
dc.subjectSick leavelanguage
dc.titleExamination of the double burden hypothesis—a systematic review of work–family conflict and sickness absencelanguage
dc.typeJournal articlelanguage
dc.typePeer reviewedlanguage
dc.date.updated2017-05-11T13:05:16Z
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionlanguage
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1093/eurpub/ckx054
dc.identifier.cristin1469686
dc.identifier.cristin1469686
dc.source.journalEuropean Journal of Public Health
dc.relation.projectIDNorges forskningsråd: 218373


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(c)
The  Author  2017.  Published  by  Oxford  University  Press  on  behalf  of  the  European  Public  Health  Association.
This  is  an  Open  Access  article  distributed  under  the  terms  of  the  Creative  Commons  Attribution  Non-Commercial  License
(http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/),  which  permits  non-commercial  re-use,  distribution,  and  reproduction  in  any  medium,
provided  the  original  work  is  properly  cited.  For  commercial  re-use,  please  contact  journals.permissions@oup.com
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as (c) The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Public Health Association. This is an Open Access article distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution Non-Commercial License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/4.0/), which permits non-commercial re-use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited. For commercial re-use, please contact journals.permissions@oup.com