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dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Patrick Lie
dc.contributor.authorDæhlen, Marianne
dc.date.accessioned2020-06-07T21:06:18Z
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-29T14:07:56Z
dc.date.available2020-06-07T21:06:18Z
dc.date.available2021-04-29T14:07:56Z
dc.date.issued2016
dc.identifier.isbn978-82-7894-597-1
dc.identifier.issn0808-5013
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12199/3466
dc.description.abstractThis report “Young in Grorud District” presents an analysis of the living conditions among adolescents in the Grorud District of Oslo. The data is derived from the larger Young in Oslo 2015 survey. Grorud District, situated in the Grorud Valley, is one of Oslo’s 15 districts, and has approximately 27 000 inhabitants. The purpose of the report is twofold. First, to provide a general overview of the living conditions, lifestyle and other aspects of adolescents’ lives and their upbringing in Grorud District. Second, to give a more in-depth analysis of the relationship between different aspects of the adolescents’ circumstances and their experiences, their views and family background. Four themes are emphasized: 1) well-being, satisfaction and safety in daily life, 2) problems and risk behavior, 3) use of substances, and 4) health. The report shows that most of the young people in Grorud District lead a good life. Most of them enjoy school, report a high level of well-being, good health and are satisfied in their local community. They participate in many leisure activities; e.g. organized leisure time activities and exercise regularly. Most the young people in our study are satisfied with their friends and have good relationships with their parents. Many do well in school and have ambitions of getting a higher education. These results are somewhat surprising since parts of the district are deprived areas, with a relatively high number of unemployed and families that are dependent on social welfare. Therefore, several of our findings deviate from the concerns that the media’s coverage of Grorud District and the neighboring districts convey. However, as in previous studies, this report shows that many of the youngsters in Grorud District live in families with fewer socioeconomic resources (e.g. parents’ economic assets and education) than other adolescents in Oslo do. A higher proportion of the youth report that they come from poor families than elsewhere in Oslo. The district has among the highest proportion of people with immigrant background in Oslo. Many of the district's young people grow up in overcrowded homes, and more of them are living with a single parent, than is the case in the rest of the city. The report highlights three challenges that youth in Grorud District face: The first relates to their psychosocial environment - the adolescents’ well-being, their satisfaction and safety, and some that relate to behavioral problems. Although the majority of youth in Grorud District thrive, several are dissatisfied with their local community. Compared to youth elsewhere in Oslo, they feel unsafe and have more often been victims of violence. The proportion who are satisfied with their friends is also slightly lower. These factors are interrelated, and suggest that some perceive their psychosocial environment as worse in the district. Some groups of youth appear to be more troubled than others are, e.g. girls are less satisfied with their local community, those who feel insecure, and the victims of bullying. Insecurity is also more prevalent among girls, those with non-immigrant backgrounds, and those exposed to violence or threats. The second problematic aspect is health. Relatively many girls express depressive symptoms, but this is not unique to Grorud District. Girls generally more often express depressive symptoms than their male peers do. The results show that the adolescents in Grorud District more frequently than youth elsewhere in Oslo are dissatisfied with their health. Less physical activity and feeling unsafe are related to poorer self-rated health. Particularly girls with immigrant backgrounds are underrepresented in regular fitness activities. The analyses show that the youths’ eating habits are basically fine, but are somewhat poorer to the rest of Oslo when compared. Especially girls and those from homes with fewer socio economic resources more often skip meals. Although, the consumption of energy drinks and dietary supplements is higher in Grorud District than elsewhere in Oslo.The final challenge relates to education. Although satisfaction with school is high and educational motivation does not differ from that in Oslo in general, the adolescents in Grorud District have poorer school grades and lower educational ambitions. Furthermore, youth in this district more often enroll into a vocational track after compulsory school than Oslo youth do in general. This choice of educational track does not qualify them for further education at university level, but prepares the students for the labor market. However, the choice of a vocational track is associated with a relatively high dropout rate. Half of the boys in the district attend vocational programs. Girls are also clearly overrepresented in vocational programs. The analyses do not show higher levels of crime than in Oslo overall. In addition, we see some especially positive aspects in the situation of the district’s adolescents compared with the rest of Oslo. First, fewer have been drunk from alcohol, fewer have used cannabis, and fewer have been offered cannabis. Second, teenagers in Grorud District are more satisfied with their youth clubs than is usual in Oslo. Third, fewer of those with immigrant backgrounds have had unpleasant experiences related to their immigrant background than elsewhere in Oslo. The analyses in this report are from the survey Young in Oslo 2015, which is a part of Ungdata - a nationwide survey that maps different aspects of young people’s everyday life and their living conditions. The Young in Oslo 2015 survey was conducted among pupils at all levels of secondary school and in high schools. In total, we received responses from more than 22,000 students that were used in the analyses. Of these 1,539 live in the Grorud District. Eighty percent of the district's youth participated in the survey. The data provide a representative picture of the situation among the students in the district.en
dc.description.abstractRapporten er en analyse av Grorud-ungdommenes levekår. Den tar for seg skole-, fritids- og familiesituasjonen, med særlig fokus på: 1) trivsel, fornøydhet og trygghet, 2) problem- og risikoatferd, 3) rusmiddelbruk og 4) helse. De fleste har en god ungdomstid. Flesteparten trives på skolen, har høyt velvære, en aktiv fritid, god helse og er fornøyd med lokalmiljøet. Rusmiddelbruken er lavere enn i Oslo for øvrig. Andelen med innvandrerbakgrunn er høy, og mange familier har færre sosioøkonomiske ressurser enn andre steder. Dette er noe av grunnen til utfordringer på tre områder: psykososialt miljø, helse og utdanning. Datamaterialet baserer seg på spørreundersøkelsen Ung i Oslo 2015. Rapporten er skrevet av forskningsinstituttet NOVA ved HiOA på bestilling av Oslo kommune, Bydel Grorud. Last ned kortversjon av rapporten herno_NB
dc.publisherOslo Metropolitan University - OsloMet: NOVA
dc.relation.ispartofseriesNOVA Rapport 10/16
dc.subjectNOVA--Youth--Ungdata
dc.titleUng i Bydel Grorud. En analyse av Grorud-ungdoms levekår i 2015no_NB
dc.typeRapport
fagarkivet.source.pagenumber119


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