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dc.contributor.authorHusby, Ellen
dc.contributor.authorSvendsen, Elisabeth Dahl
dc.contributor.authorAndersen, Hilde Kjernlie
dc.contributor.authorMartinsen, Anne Catherine Trægde
dc.date.accessioned2019-07-12T09:03:36Z
dc.date.available2019-07-12T09:03:36Z
dc.date.issued2017-09-18
dc.identifier.citationHusby, E., Svendsen, E. D., Andersen, H. K., & Martinsen, A. C. T. (2017). 100 days with scans of the same Catphan phantom on the same CT scanner. Journal of applied clinical medical physics, 18(6), 224-231.en
dc.identifier.issn1526-9914
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/10642/7282
dc.description.abstractQuality control (QC) of CT scanners is important to evaluate image quality and radiation dose. Different QC phantoms for testing image quality parameters on CT are commercially available, and Catphan phantoms are widely used for this purpose. More data from measured image quality parameters on CT are necessary to assess test methods, tolerance levels, and test frequencies. The aim of this study was to evaluate the stability of essential image quality parameters for axial and helical scans on one CT scanner over time. A Catphan 600 phantom was scanned on a Philips Ingenuity CT scanner for 100 days over a period of 6 months. At each day of testing, one helical scan covering the entire phantom and four axial scans covering four different modules in the phantom were performed. All images were uploaded into Image Owl for automatic analysis of CT numbers, modular transfer function (MTF), low‐contrast resolution, noise, and uniformity. In general, the different image quality parameters for both scan techniques were stable over time compared to given tolerance levels. Average measured CT numbers differed between axial and helical scans, while MTF was almost identical for helical and axial scans. Axial scans had better low‐contrast resolution and less noise than helical scans. The uniformity was relatively similar for axial and helical scans. Most standard deviations of measured values were larger for helical scans compared to axial scans. Test results in this study were stable over time for both scan techniques, but further studies on different CT scanners are required to confirm that this also holds true for other systems.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.publisherWileyen
dc.relation.ispartofseriesJournal of Applied Clinical Medical Physics;18(6)
dc.rightsAttribution 3.0 United States This is an open access article, originally published at https://doi.org/10.1002/acm2.12186en
dc.rights.urihttp://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/us/*
dc.subjectArtikkelen
dc.title100 days with scans of the same Catphan phantom on the same CT scanneren
dc.typeJournal articleen
dc.typePeer revieweden
dc.description.versionpublishedVersionen
dc.identifier.doihttps://doi.org/10.1002/acm2.12186
dc.identifier.cristin1524252


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Attribution 3.0 United States
This is an open access article, originally published at https://doi.org/10.1002/acm2.12186
Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as Attribution 3.0 United States This is an open access article, originally published at https://doi.org/10.1002/acm2.12186